Archive | Eco Apparel

Personalized Leggings with Twiga Clothing

Sponsored by: Twiga Clothing

Hosted by: Mommy Footprint

Twiga

I love local. And I admire companies that make the decision to manufacture locally in an industry that is mainly produced overseas – like athletic wear. It’s a much harder road but I think the rewards and awareness for these manufacturing standards is changing. Consumers know the value of slow fashion and all the hard work that goes behind making clothing carefully and close to home.

So I can’t wait to share the clothing company called Twiga Clothing. I love the story of owner Chuck making clothing for his niece. She loved the clothing and in recent years, begged him to make more. To make it special, he personalized the waistband with her name and the result was Twiga. Honestly, what little girl (or mom) wouldn’t want their name on both the waistband and leg band of athletic wear? A great idea coupled with a great story!

About Twiga Clothing

Every little girl is special, and every girl should know it. At Twiga, we make customizable, personalized leggings, shorts, yoga pants, and headbands for both you and her – all made from the highest quality materials right here in Canada.

We are excited to bring you the chance to win a comfy pair of Personalized Twiga leggings! They are made from the highest quality materials right here in Canada. The winner can select their leggings and have their name personalized on the waist and leg cuff.

Thank you to our VERY generous sponsor, Twiga Clothing for the chance to win these leggings! So, let’s get on to the giveaway!

One lucky winner will win this

Twiga Clothing Personalized Leggings ($75-$85 value)!

Giveaway ends 11/11/14 at 11:59 pm ET! Open to US and Canadian residents 18+ and older.

Enter using the Rafflecopter form below.

Good Luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Back To School With Triple Flip – Contest and Review

Sponsored by: Triple Flip

Hosted by: Mommy Footprint

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It’s a common question “where do I find every-day, locally manufactured clothing for kids?” I hear it all the time. And lucky for us, Triple Flip manufactures their stretch wear in Canada. It’s soft (great for kids with sensory issues), great quality, and fun designs have positive messages to make girls feel amazing in their clothes. My family is big fans of Triple Flip: mama likes the footprint and my twins love the clothing. This Canadian company also has a fun initiative for local families shopping for back-to-school. Bring well-loved, outgrown, clean Triple Flip clothing into our stores and all that clothing will be donated to women’s shelters and local charities. Plus, YOU will receive a 10% discount on your next purchase at Triple Flip. This program is called Designed To Grow Designed To Last and runs until early September (in store only).

About Triple Flip

Triple Flip is inspired by real girls. This Canadian company believes that having fun and feeling good, inside and out, is important. This clothing brand manufactures their stretch line in Canada and is dedicated to supporting a local footprint and producing fashion that keeps kids and pre-teens happy and confident as they grow.

We are excited to bring you this amazing $100 Gift Selection for the new Triple Flip Collection called Hydra. This new line has just launched and would be perfect for helping with back-to-school shopping. This new collection includes Triple Flip popular minky and stretch wear.
Would you love to have a new outfit worth $100 from the new Hydra collection via the Triple Flip online store? Well, our VERY generous sponsor, Triple Flip, wants one of our lucky readers to have that chance! So, let’s get on to the giveaway!

One lucky winner will win this

$100 toward Triple Flip Outfit ($100 value)!

Giveaway ends 8/26/14 at 11:59 pm ET! Open to US and Canadian residents 18+ and older.

Enter using the Rafflecopter form below.

Good Luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Disclaimer: The participating bloggers were not compensated for this post. We are not associated with any of the companies named above. No purchase is necessary to enter. Void where prohibited by law. The odds of winning are based on the number of entries received Open to US and Canada 18+ only. Confirmed Winner(s) (by Random.org) will be contacted by email. Winner(s) have 24 hours to respond before a new winner is chosen. No purchase necessary. Void where prohibited by law. The sponsor(s) will be responsible for product shipment to winner(s) of this giveaway. My blog is not responsible for product shipment/delivery. This event is in no way administered, sponsored, or endorsed by, or associated with, Facebook and/or Twitter, Google, Pinterest. This disclosure is done in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission 10 CFR, Part 255 Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

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Miou Kids – Fair Trade KnitWear

We have learned fast fashion comes at a price. It’s not displayed on the price tag, rather it’s the dark side of clothing consumers don’t see;  poor manufacturing practices resulting in chemical residue left on clothes. So it’s a pleasure to introduce you to Miou Kids’s line of clothing that has turned knitwear into beautiful, handmade fair trade collections made from baby alpaca wool and organic cotton. The Spring/Summer collection of organic cotton is their current hot seller and perfect for that special Easter outfit. article miou We have teamed up with Miou Kids for a contest and couldn’t decide between the adorable options owner Christine gave us for a contest prize (see above). Which one is your favourite? The lucky winner gets to pick. Here is more on Miou and what makes their collections different and earth friendly.

None can deny that making something from hand rather than machine is special. Both lines of alpaca and organic cotton Miou Collections are made by a certified fair trade company and knitters in Peru receive a fair wage and are able to knit from home while caring for their children. Organic cotton is used and any dyes are eco-friendly. So I guess Miou Kids would be the opposite of fast fashion. Designed by West Coast owner Christine, these collections are produced with nothing but safety, quality, and beautiful manufacturing practises. If I could get people thinking about the true cost of clothing, the question everyone needs to be asking is “why does Big Box clothing costs so little?” There is always a hidden cost to cheap clothing and it’s up to consumers to question what this cost is . . manufacturing practices, chemicals, environmental footprint, etc?

The photographer from Lark Rise Horse House that captured my twins Ecoparty, hosts Beatrix Potter and Easter portraits filled with tea parties, bunnies, chicks, and classic portraits. Any of the Miou line would be a stunning compliment for Easter or Beatrix photos.  Miou and Beatrix Potter are the perfect match – the knit bonnets are so beautiful they would make a special accessory for Easter this month. Before you enter our contest, here are a couple of interesting tips on ‘slow fashion’ from Miou that I through were very interesting. Did you know?

 1) Huge quantities of fossil fuel are needed to create machine knitted garment.
 2) Cotton is the most pesticide intensive crop in the world.
 3) Natural fibres not only have a smaller carbon footprint then synthetic but also have the advantage of being biodegradable.
 4) Alpaca is one of the most eco-friendly wool available.
Our thanks to Miou Kids for working with us to showcase clothing that’s produced with love and environmental commitment.  Good luck to all of you with the contest – I definitely want to see pictures from the winner! This contest is open to all residents in North America and will close midnight April 12th.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

** Contest entry note ** I’m excited that my friends from Groovy Green Livin, Bit Of Mom Sense, and I Don’t Blog are on board to help spread the word about Miou and this contest. They are the extra entries on the Rafflecopter post so please give them some love and follow their blogs.

Related Posts:

5 Tips To Reduce Chemicals In Clothing

5 Tips For Hosting An Eco Party

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5 Tips To Reduce Chemicals In Clothing

Since learning about fast fashion, I’m determined to limit chemicals that exist in new clothing for my kids. The concept of stylish clothing or seasonal trends in children’s clothing exists in all larger brands resulting in cheaply and quickly produced fashion. Similar to fast food, fast fashion is produced without attention to detail or concern for ingredients or materials. It’s no wonder this Greenpeace report has raised awareness when twenty-seven products were sent to independent accredited laboratories and investigated for the presence of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs), phthalates, per- and polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs). It’s freaky. We’ve been avoiding toys for our children that contain lead and other carcinogens, but we still think we’ve scored a bargin when buying that $2 t-shirt!

Here are 5 ways you can start minimizing the problem of toxic clothing in your home and it begins with shopping with a new set of rules.

1. Shift your mindset. Just like the clean, organic food we consume, there is a higher cost with buying new, quality made clothing. It’s not something to complain about because like food, you appreciate the quality and craftsmanship involved with a purchase. Once you adjust your mindset, it’s amazing how quickly you don’t mind the higher price tags. You gain a sense of peace and pride when bringing carefully selected clothing into your household to enjoy.

2. Buy less. We’ve taken off the blinders with so many aspects of healthier living. We understand that 1 box of organic cereal costs the same as 3 boxes of GMO, sugar filled cereals. We’ve accepted this with our food so why do we buy 5 t-shirts when they go on sale for $2 at a big box store? It’s scary to think that you can buy new cheaply made clothing for less than 2nd hand! We know that there is a cost to this low price. The people that have made the garments have been paid very little and the materials used to make a $2 t-shirt are cheap. So cheap that just maybe, that t-shirt contains harmful ink, pesticide treated fabric, and hormone disruptors or lead plastic decals and design. That cheap t-shirt suddenly isn’t so appealing and shouldn’t be seen as something exciting.

3. Shop local. It’s the question I get asked the most. Where can you find locally made clothes?  Well I’m happy to say it exists. More and more small and indie businesses are manufacturing locally made clothing and they are getting easier to find. If you are having trouble finding something, post a question on our Fan Page and we’ll find a designer for you. Rain gear, bathing suits and shoes are still pretty tough to find, but you can find certified Öko-Tex brands for rain protection.

4. Buy 2nd hand. I get it – I have four kids that go through stages of loving a t-shirt with Spiderman or a beloved character on the front. This doesn’t mean that you need to purchase new clothing.  Chemicals in clothing are lessoned with wear and washing, not to mention used clothing feels better for the same reasons. It would be impossible to afford all locally made or organic clothing so get in the habit of frequenting thrift stores, buy/sell sites, and clothing swap meets. Shopping used also removes the temptation to buy latest trends in fashion which has a shelf life. Rather, 2nd hand shopping promotes classic purchases that have longevity.

5. Read clothing labels. Checking a clothing label will tell you two things quickly – if the company is proud of where it’s manufactured (Made In Canada or USA is something clothing lines like to promote) and what the article of clothing is made from. Just like the habit of reading food labels, clothing labels deserve the same few minutes. Learn what it means to wear synthetic fabrics. The most cheaply made clothing I’ve seen contains polyester and this means flame retardants exists next to your child’s skin. This can easily be avoided by sticking with 2nd hand cotton clothing or new organic clothing lines.

I don’t think either of my daughters have ever worn a new pair of jeans – 2nd hand feels better. Pictured below is my 7 year old clothing label reading ninja. The first thing she wants to know when buying clothing is does it contain polyester. She has skin sensitivities so we’ve done our best to keep her in more natural fabrics since she was a baby. She also has sensory needs with clothing and prefers how 2nd hand clothing or locally made brands feel on her skin.

I hope the awareness expands for sustainable fashion in North America. The divide in price between big box and locally manufactured clothing is huge and the reason is demand. We have not yet wrapped our minds around the environmental toll fast fashion or big box fashion brands place on our planet. Maybe as parents, if we imagine that toll with our health, the shift will come. By reducing and shopping with a new set of rules for fashion, the planet and human health will benefit, while a new sector of locally made fashion will finally be able to flourish.

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Oto Design – Fleece Made Eco

Mommy Footprint is starting 2014 with a passion for locally produced fashion. Future fashion posts will explain why the concept of sustainably made clothing is so important at a global level. The term ‘fast fashion’ and it’s parallel to ‘fast food’ is shocking because both are produced cheaply and quickly which lends a toll on the environment and human health. More to come on this topic.

Help me welcome  Co-owners Rachael and Allison who are the proud business owners behind Oto Design. My twins received an Oto dress and sweater before Christmas and live in them!  Not only does Oto Design produce fashion that kids love to wear, but they’ve done it with fleece that doesn’t contain flame retardants. My daughter that stays clear of polyester because of skin sensitivities has loved the comfort of her Oto dress. She also has sensory reactions to clothing and because the seams are on the outside of the Oto clothing, this isn’t an issue for kids or adults normally sensitive to internally sewn seams or tags. Check out the slideshow of a few Oto designs (yes they have a kids and adult line) and then we’ll talk more about manufacturing and a fun contest!

Oto Design is obviously very cute but they have some really cool business practices.  Here are some inside track facts on Oto Design:

-  made in Canada, Vancouver to be exact.
–  growing, streamlined production of their lines mean local jobs are created in Vancouver.
– Oto sources Polartec fleece that doesn’t contain flame retardants (and is made in the USA).
– Oto fleece is manufactured from recycled pop bottles.
– support two moms with a vision, great product, and a dream. I know big box stores sell fleece, but it’s mass produced using fast fashion practices and will contain flame retardants.
– Oto recommends spot washing the sweaters and then occasional wash in cold water, hang to dry. Ocean activists will tell you why this is amazing advice when a product is made using polyester. **

Here is your chance to win an Oto Design sweater. The lucky winner will win a sweater for an adult or child so it’s a great contest for all Mommy Footprint readers. The contest is open from January 29th until February 4th at midnight and all participants must reside in North America. We love the idea of an Oto Design for a special Valentines gift, so you might want to take advantage of their Valentine sale by entering the word LOVE at checkout until Feb 1st.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

** Our washing machines aren’t manufactured with small enough filters to capture plastic sediment from polyester or other synthetic matierals from washing clothes. Toxic dyes used to produce clothing would also be a problem. If you imagine these micro sediments flushed into our ocean from washing and the animals that consume it – scary to think that small amount of dye and plastic is consumed by fish that we end up eating.

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